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Paper iaps_12_1992_1_208:
SOURCES OF INSPIRATION AND THE DYCAMICS OF DESIGN THE NEW TOWN OF BOIS-FRANC IN QUEBEC, CANADA

id iaps_12_1992_1_208
authors Sauer, Louis
year 1992
title SOURCES OF INSPIRATION AND THE DYCAMICS OF DESIGN THE NEW TOWN OF BOIS-FRANC IN QUEBEC, CANADA
source Arisitidis, A., Karaletsou, C. and Tsoukala, K. (ed.), Socio-environmental Metamorphoses (Proceedings 12th International Conference of the IAPS), Chalkidikik, Greece, 11-14 July 1992
summary This paper analyzes the process of designing for a private client a new town for 25 000 people adjacent to and north-west of Montreal, from begining ideas to the principles and pragmatics that guide its final plan. It outlines the stages of design, from the designer's aspiration to provide a plan and physical context sustaining public and community life to the actual design of a city structured by various kinds of open space networks. The client's intention to have a unique "signature" town in the Québec context lead the designer to opt for the use of water as a major theme to capture the imagination and to enhance the contrast in a nordic climate between summer and winter city and social landscapes. His vision stemmed from the desire to design an urban plan, rather than the conventional suburban plans that are offered around large cities. Such a plan was to provide at once a strong singular image as well as to allow the integration through time of various economic groups, building types as well as architectural styles. The urban approach implies that the streets and squares are the social spaces of each neighborhood as well as of the entire town. The notion of "rooms within rooms, within rooms" guided the determination of the scale of neighborhood units, the localisation of squares, as well as the main "central" community park and water features. While never seen as models, the urban precedents used to focus the first stages of design for the hierarchy of streets, squares, parks, lakes and canals were Savannah, Georgia, Amsterdam and more specific places in Canda, Europe and the United States. The achievement of this design is a high percentage of private land within a very strong open space structure, with clear, imageable primary circulation, and a hierarchy of large and small scaled places. Such an organization of open spaces is generally supported by public rather than private clients. The designer however was able to show his private client that a variety of well structured systems of open spaces enhances the market value of the land.
series conference:IAPS:12
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